What is Lent for?


One of the things Gina and I are doing for Lent is making time to pray together every weekday morning. We are finding this time together to be a real blessing. We pray the psalm for the day (it can be found in the Daily Readings Lectionary in back of the Book of Common Prayer- if you need help finding it, I’ll gladly assist you) and then we use a daily prayer resource Gina created for her parish. It’s very well done. She begins with the gospel reading for the day (they are the same for both the Episcopal and Roman Catholic readings cycles) and then she asked people in her parish to offer a reflection and a prayer. It’s wonderful to see the depth and faith expressed on those pages – I hope we can create something like this at St. Mary’s next year.

I am hopeful that this practice will continue after Lent is over – it is a great way to begin the day, and coming together as a couple to share a moment of prayer at the start of the day is, for us, a real gift. We had done this before, but usually at a later point in the morning, and sometimes when one or both of us were busy, the prayer got set aside. Now, it’s the first thing we attend to- and that is only right. This is one of the blessings I am receiving this Lent.

As I look at disciplines of Lent, there are many that are life -giving and that lead to spiritual growth, especially if they give rise to a new way of living and practicing faith. The more temporary disciplines can bring life and greater awareness of our need for God, as well, but to me the real gift of Lent is the transformations that stay with us well after the season has ended.

Lord, help us to understand what it means to fast, pray and give alms during this season of Lent. Help us to see how you may be calling us during Lent to make changes in our lives for the long haul… Amen!

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2 Responses to What is Lent for?

  1. Pingback: Psalms and Lent « Silverwalking

  2. Pingback: Catholic Phoenix | Cowboy Papist

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